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Health Reminders From the School Nurse
Health Reminders From the School Nurse
Scott Nipper
Friday, February 07, 2020

From the School Nurse

The main goal of the school nurse is to keep children safe and healthy at school.  Below are some reminders on when a child should be kept at home or when a parent be called to pick up their child from school.

•         Fever > 100.0F in the past 24 hours --- Tylenol and ibuprofen can mask the effects of a fever.  Children should be “fever free” for 24 hours WITHOUT medicine before returning to school.

•         Cough/Congestion/etc. --- Children with “bad” or persistent coughs, especially if it keeps them awake all night, should not be sent to school. 

•         Vomiting or Diarrhea --- Children who experience more than one episode of vomiting or diarrhea should stay home until 24 hours after the last episode.  A child may be   sent to school if they ONLY had one episode and the parent is confident it is a “one-time deal” and not a stomach virus. 

•         Strep Throat --- Children diagnosed with strep throat should not be sent to school until after 24 hours of antibiotics or longer if determined by physician.  A doctor’s excuse should also be sent with the child upon their return to school.

•         Pink eye --- Children having redness in the white of the eyes, itching, yellow or green   discharge, or matted eyelashes are signs of conjunctivitis or pink eye.  Pink eye is highly contagious, so if these symptoms are present a follow up with your child’s physician should be done.  Children should not be sent to school until after 24 hours of receiving prescribed antibiotic eye drops or as otherwise decided by their physician.  A doctor’s excuse should also be sent with the child upon their return to school.

•         Rash --- Including, but not limited to blisters that are oozing and painful, could be a sign of a contagious infection such as chicken pox, impetigo, etc.  Children should receive a follow up with a physician before returning to school.

•         Wounds or Lesions --- Students with skin infections should follow up with their physician and may return to school at their physician’s discretion.  Any wound or lesion with drainage (“pus”) needs to be covered and contained with a clean, dry bandage.  

•         Pain --- Including earaches, toothaches, headaches, etc.  Parents will be called to pick up their child if the child is in severe pain or not able to perform in school due to the pain.